Clarifications of the Austro-Wicksellian Business Cycle Theory

by Mario Rizzo There has been a lively debate on forecasts of high inflation made by those worried about the Fed’s recent policy of quantitative easing. For details I refer the reader to Daniel Kuehn's excellent blog. The question to which I address myself is solely “What do these predictions have to do with core Austrian … Continue reading Clarifications of the Austro-Wicksellian Business Cycle Theory

A “Kleinian” Version of Austrian Business Cycle Theory

by Gene Callahan The next phase in my (now our, as I've taken on a colleague) project of thinking through Dan Klein's Knowledge and Coordination is to see how his ideas might be used to help describe business cycle theories and demonstrate commonalities they share. Note: the point of the present exercise is simply to try to … Continue reading A “Kleinian” Version of Austrian Business Cycle Theory

Fads as Social Cycles

We don't follow fashion That would be a joke You know we're going to set them set them So everyone can take note take note -- Adam Ant and Marco Pirroni by Gene Callahan* In his book Knowledge and Coordination, Daniel Klein distinguishes between mutual coordination and concatenate coordination. Mutual coordination is coordination which people intend: you … Continue reading Fads as Social Cycles

Notes on a General Theory of the Social Cycle

by Gene Callahan Monday past at our colloquium Andreas Hoffman presented a fascinating paper attempting to depict Austrian Business Cycle Theory as a special case of a more general business cycle theory based upon Hayek's later work on spontaneous orders. Hoffman's general idea (I won't do it justice in this brief summary, so please have a … Continue reading Notes on a General Theory of the Social Cycle

O’Driscoll and Rizzo Got There First

by Gene Callahan I had believed that Tony Carilli and Greg Dempster ("Expectations in Austrian Business Cycle Theory: An Application of the Prisoner's Dilemma," The Review of Austrian Economics, 2001) made a major advance in Austrian Business Cycle Theory by hitting upon the correct solution to the challenge presented by, for instance, Gordon Tullock, who … Continue reading O’Driscoll and Rizzo Got There First

Yes, Paul: It is Hayek versus Keynes

by Mario Rizzo Although by the standards of contemporary economics, I am a historian of economic thought, I am not a historian of economic thought, properly considered. Thus my major interest in F.A. Hayek’s business cycle theory is not from the point of view of a historian. My interest is only incidentally in how Hayek’s contributions … Continue reading Yes, Paul: It is Hayek versus Keynes

Thomas Mayer: “I am an Austrian in Economics”

by Andreas Hoffmann In today's publication Thomas Mayer writes that he is "an Austrian in economics." Mayer is the chief economist of Deutsche Bank Group and head of Deutsche Bank Research. Mayer argues that Austrian theory fits recent events well.  He suggests that "Failure of the liquidationists to overcome the Great Depression of the early … Continue reading Thomas Mayer: “I am an Austrian in Economics”

Resource Allocation Distortions in the Great Recession: Empirical Evidence

by Mario Rizzo The recent annual report of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) has focused attention on the sectoral imbalances in the previous boom that resulted in the Great Recession. This is a refreshing change from the excessively aggregative analyses of the Keynesian-stimulus crowd.   It is well known that John Maynard Keynes himself was … Continue reading Resource Allocation Distortions in the Great Recession: Empirical Evidence

The Role of the Perverse Elasticity of Credit Money

by Andreas Hoffmann I want to bring a recent comment by Sornette and von der Backe to the attention of the reader (in Nature 471, p. 166, May 2011). Sornette and von der Backe remind us to pay more attention to disequilibria caused by the fractional reserve banking system to explain the emergence of crises. … Continue reading The Role of the Perverse Elasticity of Credit Money