Herbert Davenport: The Economics of Enterprise

by Richard M. Ebeling* This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the publication of Herbert J. Davenport’s (1861-1931), The Economics of Enterprise, which appeared in the early months of 1913. Both mainstream economists as well as many “Austrians” seem to have long since forgotten Herbert Davenport. But during his time he was recognized as one … Continue reading Herbert Davenport: The Economics of Enterprise

The Limits of Bayesian Inference

by Gene Callahan Dan Klein's Knowledge and Coordination has something interesting to say about Bayesian inference, although he never explicitly addresses that topic. Consider the following: Here, we have the distinction between responding to the realization of events within a framework of recognized variables and relationships and the discovery of a fresh opportunity to embrace a new … Continue reading The Limits of Bayesian Inference

The Infrastructure Death Rattle

by Mario Rizzo The incessant discussion and demand for job-creating infrastructure spending on the part of the news media, Democratic politicians, and some unreconstructed Keynesian economists is both frustrating and pathetic. It is frustrating because how many times can people repeat the same thing without listening to the objections? It is pathetic because the level … Continue reading The Infrastructure Death Rattle

Kirznerian Baseball

by Gene Callahan The Mets recently hired Paul DePodesta, one of the key developer's of the "Moneyball" approach to finding and hiring baseball talent in Oakland. DePodesta describes what Moneyball really is here: DePodesta, who left Oakland to serve as the Los Angeles Dodgers’ general manager for two seasons before becoming an executive with the … Continue reading Kirznerian Baseball