Neither Charity Nor Truth, Part 3: The Attack on Classical Liberalism

by Mario Rizzo   In this final installment of my analysis of the papal encyclical letter Caritas in Veritate I turn my attention to Benedict XVI's positive ideas on globalization.  (I put the encyclical section numbers in parentheses.)   Do not expect clear-cut statements or precise recommendations for policy. Do not even expect consistency. (There are actually … Continue reading Neither Charity Nor Truth, Part 3: The Attack on Classical Liberalism

Neither Truth Nor Charity, Part 2: Globalization and the Pope’s Discontents

by Mario Rizzo   Throughout Pope Benedict XVI’s enclyclical (“Caritas in Veritate”) he stresses that scientific knowledge is not enough when trying to determine appropriate government policies or even individual actions. This is quite true.   He fails, however, to appreciate in many specific instances and arguments the importance of the fact that that moral or ethical … Continue reading Neither Truth Nor Charity, Part 2: Globalization and the Pope’s Discontents

Tribal Healthcare

by Mario Rizzo The healthcare debate is bringing out some interesting ideas. Consider what the philosopher Peter Singer (Princeton) had to say in the New York Times: “The death of a teenager is a greater tragedy than the death of an 85-year-old, and this should be reflected in our priorities.  We can accommodate that difference … Continue reading Tribal Healthcare

Neither Truth Nor Charity: The Destructive Influence of a Papal Encyclical

by Mario Rizzo   Recently Pope Benedict XVI issued a papal letter (“encyclical”) called “Caritas in Veritate” [CV] or “Charity in Truth” which is largely about economic issues relating to globalization. While there have been some commentaries on it, two prominent ones (here and here) in the Wall Street Journal do not reveal how truly bad … Continue reading Neither Truth Nor Charity: The Destructive Influence of a Papal Encyclical

It’s Just a Trick of Evolution!

by Gene Callahan In a blog discussion, I recently ran across, yet again, an extremely odd and quite empty argument against morality being objective. "Ha," the poster proclaimed, "morality is just a product of evolutionary selection!" At this point, it's supposed to be obvious that moral principles aren't "real" but are merely some sort of … Continue reading It’s Just a Trick of Evolution!

Rent Control and Torture

by Roger Koppl Dick Cheney has intimated that water boarding yielded important, actionable intelligence.  The evidence points the other way, however.  Some evidence suggests that there may have been an ulterior motive for at least some “harsh interrogations,” namely, to link Iraq and al Qaeda.  We need more analysis of Bush-era torture from an economic … Continue reading Rent Control and Torture

“No one deserves their pay”

by Sandy Ikeda Megan McArdle, blogging about the issue of “fair pay” on Wall Street, in the context of the recent bailouts, makes the following provocative statement: No one deserves their pay, so I can hardly be angry at the folks on Wall Street for taking what they could get… Trying to make as much … Continue reading “No one deserves their pay”

In Defense of Reasonable Ideology

    by Mario Rizzo   There have been many statements recently to the effect that we should not let “ideology” or “philosophy” stand in the way of solving our economic problems.  Indeed, the Obama Administration (and the previous Bush Administration) are keen to persuade us to drop all of this prejudice and to go … Continue reading In Defense of Reasonable Ideology

Economic Planning versus Democracy: Illustrations from the Commentators

  by Mario Rizzo   Some time ago I posted  “Planning and Democracy” and the related “How Hayek Explains Bush on the Auto Bailout.” Since then I have been struck by how almost every day we see the tension between central direction of economic resources and democracy manifested in the attitudes and analysis of commentators. … Continue reading Economic Planning versus Democracy: Illustrations from the Commentators

Time for Reflection: Cicero, Liberality and Katrina

by Mario Rizzo   Some time ago I came across this quotation from Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 – 43 BC), the Roman orator, senator, philosopher and opponent of the dictatorship of Julius Caesar. I have a picture of stone bust of him both in my office and my home. (Yes, I like him.)   There are, … Continue reading Time for Reflection: Cicero, Liberality and Katrina