The Blanchard Danger

by Roger Koppl Oliver Blanchard tells us “Where Danger Lurks”  in the macro-finance world. The big theme is nonlinearity, which is a profoundly conservative move: DSGE modeling is just fine and we don’t need to rethink it at all. We just need to add in some nonlinearities. Blanchard does not tell how to calibrate a … Continue reading The Blanchard Danger

Income Inequality Matters

by Roger Koppl Income inequality matters. Let me say that again so you know I meant it: Income inequality matters. This statement may be surprising coming from a self-described “Austrian” economist and a “liberal” in the good old-fashioned pro-market sense. It shouldn’t be. It should be one of our issues. The surprise should be that we … Continue reading Income Inequality Matters

Wisconsin Policy Lab

by Chidem Kurdas Paul Ryan is said to be influenced by Milton Friedman, Friedrich von Hayek and Ayn Rand. One might add that as the representative for Wisconsin's first congressional district, he is from a state that has often been in the vanguard of policy thinking. That he came up with specific proposals for Medicare and … Continue reading Wisconsin Policy Lab

Regulation Czar’s Net Effect

by Chidem Kurdas Cass Sunstein, the White House regulatory affairs chief, is going back to academia.  It is not clear why he chose this particular time to return to Harvard Law School, leaving behind what looked like an experiment to implement the notions he advocated. Has he made a difference as federal overseer of rulemaking? The record … Continue reading Regulation Czar’s Net Effect

Top Young Economists Consider Their Future

by Roger Koppl Ali Wyne of the big think  blog “Power Games”  recently posted an interesting set of comments on the theme “Empirics and Psychology: Eight of the World’s Top Young Economists Discuss Where Their Field Is Going.”  George Mason’s own Peter Leeson  was among the eight “top young economists” sharing their views. Over at … Continue reading Top Young Economists Consider Their Future

The Unfairness of Taxi Fares

by Mario Rizzo Some time ago I was accused by the noted economist and psychiatrist Professor Bradford DeLong of being a "psychopath" and "clinically crazy" because I suggested that people should not tip cab drivers in New York City. I do not intend to revisit that particular issue here. This time I would like to … Continue reading The Unfairness of Taxi Fares

Hundred Years of Bailouts

by Chidem Kurdas After all that’s been said and written about financial crises, it is rare to come across useful insights.  Financing Failure. A Century of Bailouts by Vern McKinley documents a major continuity with past policy making. He shows that policies intended to prop up failing companies are nothing new—the same basic pattern has recurred time … Continue reading Hundred Years of Bailouts

Is Justice Roberts a Big Player?

by Roger Koppl The Supreme Court upheld “Obamacare” because Chief Justice Roberts changed his mind. (It seems that “Obamacare” is no longer a pejorative.)  In this curious situation, a stalwart of the Federalist Society  has become a Big Player in healthcare markets. A Big Player is a powerful actor who uses discretion to influence a … Continue reading Is Justice Roberts a Big Player?

Remember Those Oil Speculators?

by Chidem Kurdas Less than two months ago, President Obama claimed that speculators were (or at least might be) artificially driving up the price of oil—a notion that some politician or pundit  brings up every time gasoline looks expensive. The idea fades when the market changes direction. Thus in recent weeks, economies worldwide took a … Continue reading Remember Those Oil Speculators?