The Cost of Making Exceptions

by Mario Rizzo  

As a political and legal culture, we do not know how to deal with slippery-slope tendencies. The recent discussion (here and here, and many other places) of the public-accommodations provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 has made me more conscious of this issue.  

I am willing to agree for purposes of this post that the law forbidding private storeowners, hotels, and other merchants to discriminate on the basis of race was morally justified under the institutional conditions of the day.  

The problem, from my perspective, is that the cost of making exceptions to general principles is not sufficiently appreciated. Benefits may exceed costs in a particular case, but if these costs are not fully recognized, the course of action taken may lead to bad decisions down the road.  Continue reading