Income Inequality Matters

by Roger Koppl Income inequality matters. Let me say that again so you know I meant it: Income inequality matters. This statement may be surprising coming from a self-described “Austrian” economist and a “liberal” in the good old-fashioned pro-market sense. It shouldn’t be. It should be one of our issues. The surprise should be that we … Continue reading Income Inequality Matters

We should pay more attention to Radley Balko

by Roger Koppl On June 14th, Radley Balko posted an article on Huffington Post entitled "Private Crime Labs Could Prevent Errors, Analyst Bias: Report."  He explains some of the problems of forensic science in the US.  He suggests that "rivalrous redundancy" could improve the system and links to my 2007 Reason Foundation Report explaining how rivalrous … Continue reading We should pay more attention to Radley Balko

Arizona law a blow to liberty

by Roger Koppl Kris Kobach defends Arizona's new immigration law, SB 1070, in today's New York Times.  He says, "Presumably, the government lawyers . . . will actually read the law, something its critics don’t seem to have done."  Well, I read the law and I do not like it. Whenever a  law enforcement officer makes … Continue reading Arizona law a blow to liberty

Epistemic monopoly is still a bad thing

by Roger Koppl McClatchy-Tribune Information Services has been distributing my op ed with Dan Krane on "Science rules the FBI should obey."  We discuss an example of epistemic monopoly in action, namely, the FBI's failure so far to release anonymized data from its vast NDIS (National DNA Index System) data set.  The NDIS data set contains … Continue reading Epistemic monopoly is still a bad thing

Who will capture forensic science?

by Roger Koppl Friday I spoke at a conference on  Forensic Science in the 21st Century: The National Academy of Sciences Report and Beyond.   The report was a humdinger.  It says,  “The bottom line is simple: In a number of forensic science disciplines, forensic science professionals have yet to establish either the validity of their approachor the accuracy … Continue reading Who will capture forensic science?

Now it’s official: forensic science is a mess

by Roger Koppl The NAS released a much-anticipated report on forensic science last month.  The report said, “With the exception of nuclear DNA analysis, however, no forensic method has been rigorously shown to have the capacity to consistently, and with a high degree of certainty, demonstrate a connection between evidence and a specific individual or … Continue reading Now it’s official: forensic science is a mess

A Gem in the Folded Palm of Forensic Science

by Roger Koppl I’ve been railing against epistemic monopolies for a while now, particularly in forensic science.  This project complements Peart and Levy’s work on experts.  (See their symposium the 2008 Eastern Economics Journal, vol. 38 starting page 103.)  I keep insisting that we need redundancy to reduce error rates.  Economists, forensic scientists, and philosophers … Continue reading A Gem in the Folded Palm of Forensic Science

Flaming torches and pitchforks

by Roger Koppl Forensic scientist Brian Gestring laments “The Dawn of the ‘Forensic Science Provocateur’” in the latest CAC News.  That’s the newsletter of the California Association of Criminalists.  He objects to the “peripheral waves of lawyers and business professors that have . . . found a new calling, that of Forensic Science Provocateur.”  But … Continue reading Flaming torches and pitchforks

If redundancy is good enough for the rich and famous . . .

by Roger Koppl According to Associated Press, “Bahamas using 2 experts for Travolta son autopsy.” (HT Ed Lopez.)  Actor John Travolta’s son Jett died tragically on Friday, January 2nd, after hitting his head in a fall.  (It seems he had an illness that left him subject to seizures.)  The E! News story says, “A government … Continue reading If redundancy is good enough for the rich and famous . . .

Epistemic monopoly may let the bad guys get away

by Roger Koppl The Chicago Tribune gives us another example of the trouble with epistemic monopolies.  They uncovered a case in which the police in the Chicago area city of Harvey, Illinois ignored a DNA match in a rape case.  In two other rape cases they did not submit the rape kit for analysis.  Madison … Continue reading Epistemic monopoly may let the bad guys get away