The Passions and the Interests in Forensic Science

by Roger Koppl A front-page article  in yesterday’s Washington Post underlines the importance of establishing a substantive defense right to expertise in the US. The article says, “Justice Department officials have known for years that flawed forensic work might have led to the convictions of potentially innocent people, but prosecutors failed to notify defendants or … Continue reading The Passions and the Interests in Forensic Science

Epistemic monopoly is still a bad thing

by Roger Koppl McClatchy-Tribune Information Services has been distributing my op ed with Dan Krane on "Science rules the FBI should obey."  We discuss an example of epistemic monopoly in action, namely, the FBI's failure so far to release anonymized data from its vast NDIS (National DNA Index System) data set.  The NDIS data set contains … Continue reading Epistemic monopoly is still a bad thing

Now it’s official: forensic science is a mess

by Roger Koppl The NAS released a much-anticipated report on forensic science last month.  The report said, “With the exception of nuclear DNA analysis, however, no forensic method has been rigorously shown to have the capacity to consistently, and with a high degree of certainty, demonstrate a connection between evidence and a specific individual or … Continue reading Now it’s official: forensic science is a mess

A Gem in the Folded Palm of Forensic Science

by Roger Koppl I’ve been railing against epistemic monopolies for a while now, particularly in forensic science.  This project complements Peart and Levy’s work on experts.  (See their symposium the 2008 Eastern Economics Journal, vol. 38 starting page 103.)  I keep insisting that we need redundancy to reduce error rates.  Economists, forensic scientists, and philosophers … Continue reading A Gem in the Folded Palm of Forensic Science