The Passions and the Interests in Forensic Science

by Roger Koppl A front-page article  in yesterday’s Washington Post underlines the importance of establishing a substantive defense right to expertise in the US. The article says, “Justice Department officials have known for years that flawed forensic work might have led to the convictions of potentially innocent people, but prosecutors failed to notify defendants or … Continue reading The Passions and the Interests in Forensic Science

We should pay more attention to Radley Balko

by Roger Koppl On June 14th, Radley Balko posted an article on Huffington Post entitled "Private Crime Labs Could Prevent Errors, Analyst Bias: Report."  He explains some of the problems of forensic science in the US.  He suggests that "rivalrous redundancy" could improve the system and links to my 2007 Reason Foundation Report explaining how rivalrous … Continue reading We should pay more attention to Radley Balko

Epistemic monopoly is still a bad thing

by Roger Koppl McClatchy-Tribune Information Services has been distributing my op ed with Dan Krane on "Science rules the FBI should obey."  We discuss an example of epistemic monopoly in action, namely, the FBI's failure so far to release anonymized data from its vast NDIS (National DNA Index System) data set.  The NDIS data set contains … Continue reading Epistemic monopoly is still a bad thing

Flaming torches and pitchforks

by Roger Koppl Forensic scientist Brian Gestring laments “The Dawn of the ‘Forensic Science Provocateur’” in the latest CAC News.  That’s the newsletter of the California Association of Criminalists.  He objects to the “peripheral waves of lawyers and business professors that have . . . found a new calling, that of Forensic Science Provocateur.”  But … Continue reading Flaming torches and pitchforks