COSMOS + TAXIS Issue on Jane Jacobs

by Sandy Ikeda Jane Jacobs’ writings span several disciplines—including ethics and most especially economics—but she is best known for her contributions to and her critique of urban planning, design, and policy. Many of those whom she influenced in academia, policy, and activism took the occasion of her one-hundredth birthday in 2016 to celebrate those contributions … Continue reading COSMOS + TAXIS Issue on Jane Jacobs

The mirage of the efficient city

by Sandy Ikeda I'm honored to be contributing a short essay to a Festschrift for Jane Jacobs.  Recently, the editor asked me to write an abstract.  The following is the result, which I would like to share with you: A city is not a man-made thing.  Rather, it emerges from the actions of its inhabitants, … Continue reading The mirage of the efficient city

Infrastructure: How the seen crowds out the unseen

by Sandy Ikeda So far I’ve come across no discussion of the consequences that the massive infrastructure spending touted in Stimulus Package I (there will of course be others) will have on what Nathan Glazer called “the fine structure of society” in the local communities it will impact. A new freeway, for example, might make … Continue reading Infrastructure: How the seen crowds out the unseen

Ken-Ichi Sasaki on “Urban Tactility”

by Sandy Ikeda One of the most striking things about the Tokyo skyline, at least for me, is how striking it isn't. Viewed from afar — e.g., from its very-expensive-to-use elevated expressways (Narita Airport is too far from the city center to afford a decent panorama from the air) — the city, with few exceptions … Continue reading Ken-Ichi Sasaki on “Urban Tactility”

On corners: My father and Jane Jacobs

by Sandy Ikeda Also in “The City” section of Sunday’s The New York Times is a fun article about city corners called “Cornerville” that details the intensity of life at a particular spot of urban convergence, the intersection of 23rd Street and 7th Avenue, near the famed Chelsea Hotel.  (Curiously, the article seems to just … Continue reading On corners: My father and Jane Jacobs